Our 3 year old always had puffy eyes, we just thought that was the way she looked. We don't eat whole eggs, I would only use them in cooking such as in a cake or at most a quiche because I used to throw up after eating them as a child. After we started the elimination diet my husband made the home made Mayo in your recipe book and because it uses raw egg, she had a more pronounced response. We missed the first response, it’s so much easier with hindsight!  She mucked up at the dinner table straight away after trying the salad, wouldn't sit still, so we sent her to her room. After 5 minutes I went in and her eye was all puffy, I asked her what happened, did she fall? and she said "yes". But I noticed that the eye didn't blacken like a bruise over the next day or so. Two days later my husband gave her the same salad dressing. Again she mucked up at the dinner table, I took her to her room, but I laid her on the change table and that's when I saw she had hives coming up around her mouth. I knew that was bad so I grabbed her and took her straight to the hospital. Over three hours she slowly reacted, the hives went down and then the eyes started puffing up. We saw the Paediatric Registrar who told us "these things sometimes happen when they have a virus - take her home and giver her antihistamine". At that stage one eye was almost closed and the other eye was well on the way and the doctor had noticed she had a runny nose. I was yet to learn so much. I took her home, the runny nose wasn't from a cold it was her nasal airways closing up. I gave her the antihistamine and we stayed up most of the night to make sure she was okay.

After that I rang the hospital and asked for a referral to get her checked for egg allergy and the paediatrician tried to fob me off. If there is one thing I have learnt with my five year old, it is that I have to be my child's advocate. I stood my ground and pushed until the doctor gave in. When we eventually got to see the allergist some four months later, my suspicion was confirmed. My daughter was very allergic to both egg white and egg yolk. Not anaphylactic, one step away. I have since been to a number of talks and learnt about anaphylaxis. One of the most important things I have since learnt (for us) is that children who have a decent allergy to an item, will often turn anaphylactic if they go on to develop asthma. My husband and I are both asthmatic and are now very vigilant. – by email, and see Nell’s egg free cake recipe in Cooks Corner (Failsafe Newsletter #50).